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APPLYING PRACTICAL INSIGHT TO
COMPLEX FINANCIAL CONCEPTS

Karen Firestone has spent over thirty years honing skills applied to
the investment world, while at the same time navigating a path through the work/familyscape. She considers many issues from an unusual angle, including stock market movement, factors facing professional women today, and how to think in simple terms about some complex financial structures. Karen shares her observations in posts that also appear in the Harvard Business Review and Huffington Post. As the CEO of Aureus Asset Management, a former fund manager at Fidelity Investments, and the mother of four grown children, Karen has a rare perspective into which she injects humor and some irreverence.

Kari on Dot Complicated’s #52women52weeks

Kari has been recognized by Dot Complicated with Randi Zuckerberg (which airs on SiriusXM Channel 111) in its #52women52weeks campaign, where the show recognizes a woman in business once a week for a full year. Check out the conversation on her LinkedIn page here

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WSJ: U.S. Drug Spending Climb

By PETER LOFTUS April 14, 2016 12:01 a.m. ET The new Hepatitis C drugs are accounting for much of this increase.  Will it be worth it to have brought such headline risk to the industry? Read the full article in The Wall Street Journal

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Why That Risky Career Move Could Be a Safer Bet than You Think

Group of people on inflatable whitewater raft covered by water while rafting down river. Rio Cangrejal, Honduras

By Karen Firestone MARCH 11, 2016 Karen’s latest piece featured in the Harvard Business Review discusses the impossibility of avoiding risk altogether. Read the full article on HBR.com   Kalinda has a high-paying job at an investment company and lives outside of Boston with her fiancé. They love running in the parks near their home…

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WSJ: The Crisis in American Entrepreneurship

By JEFFREY SPARSHOTT Mar 7, 2016 10:13 am ET Start-ups might be suffering but not due to fewer ideas. Concepts can be too costly and uneconomic to develop after years of venture firms throwing money at entrepreneurs. Read the full article in The Wall Street Journal

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